Nothing Is Invisible

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Posts Tagged ‘The Crossing’

Caribou Island by David Vann

Posted by the editors on Monday, 23 January 2012

Caribou Island (2011)(Novel) by David Vann (Legend of a Suicide (2008))  Caribou Island, David Vann’s first novel, after his awardwinning collection of stories Legend of a Suicide, is rife with failed communication, the characters brimming with regret, misperception and self-delusion, and all suffering from psychological isolation; these bleak, dysfunctional characters relentlessly arcing their way toward certain disaster.  Written with a passionate and sharp eye for landscape and environment, used as a metaphor for the apparent, and dream-like, beauty and inherently brutal, fatal desolation of life and with, perhaps, an inspiration from Cormac McCarthy’s sensitivity to place, combined with some of the fatal flaws of Raymond Carver’s often doomed characters, Caribou Island is an inspired noir novel, full of precise descriptive prose, and often sensitive and frustratingly lost individuals inexorably struggling toward their painful ends. (PR)

See our posts on the novels The Crossing, All the Pretty Horses, The Orchard Keeper, Blood Meridian and Outer Dark, by Cormac McCarthy and our post on the collection of short stories What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, by Raymond Carver.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, General, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Blood Meridian (or the Evening Redness in the West)

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 6 September 2011

Cover of the 1st edition

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy, first edition cover

Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West (1985)(novel) by Cormac McCarthy (The Orchard Keeper (1965), All the Pretty Horses (1992), The Crossing (1994), No Country for Old Men (2005), The Road (2006)).  Considered by many to be one of the finest American novels of the 20th century, and often compared to Herman Melville‘s masterpiece Moby Dick, Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian is, in quasi-mystical counter-point to its extraordinarily violent plot, a monument to the infinite color and sensitivity of words, phrases and, even, punctuation, odd as that may sound.  A masterful work by one of the best English-language writers of any epoque, Blood Meridian is a work of dense complexity, awesome mastery of language and form, pan-cultural validity, and, amazingly and marvelously, edge-of-your-seat excitement, not to mention, perhaps, a bit of shock. (PR)

See our post on Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy here.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Books, Language, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 23 August 2011

Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy

Outer Dark (1968)(novel) by Cormac McCarthy (Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West (1985), All the Pretty Horses (1992), The Crossing (1994), No Country for Old Men (2005))  Cormac McCarthy’s second novel, Outer Dark, is another of McCarthy’s haunting, touching, devastating (and devastated-) road-novels, with which we are all sadly and happily familiar, at least since the eponymously titled film version (2009, starring Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee, with Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce, Robert Duvall and others) of his 2007 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Road (2006).  McCarthy’s prose, as sharply modern as it is dialectally, poetically obscure is always masterful and simply must be read. (PR)

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Posted in Book Reviews, Language, Links, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

 
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