Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘The Bandini Quartet’

Beginners – What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 12 July 2011

Beginners by Raymond Carver

Beginners (collection of short stories) (2009) by Raymond Carver    Beginners is the manuscript edition of the masterful short story writer Raymond Carver’s collection of stories What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, originally published in 1981.  Published by Carver’s wife and widow, Tess Gallagher, in 2009 (Carver himself died in 1988 at the age of 50), Beginners contains the original versions of the stories in WWTAWWTAL, prior to the rather drastic editing by Gordon Lish, Carver’s editor at Knopf.  The stories in Beginners, wonderful and sad, often lost in questions of love, family and life, and most always steeped in abundant alcohol, could be considered Dirty Realism, much as the work of John Fante (see our post on The Bandini Quartet), though much of Fante’s work predates the “movement” per se. (PR)

What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

large images: Vintage Books, Knopf/Wikipedia

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Advertisements

Posted in Book Reviews, culture, Language, Links, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Imperial Bedrooms

Posted by the editors on Friday, 1 July 2011

Imperial bedrooms cover.JPG

Imperial Bedrooms by Bret Easton Ellis

Imperial Bedrooms (2010)(novel) by Bret Easton Ellis  (American Psycho (1991), Lunar Park (2005))  Imperial Bedrooms, a present day sequel to Ellis’ 1985 best-selling debut novel Less Than Zero containing many of the same characters as they approach middle-age, surges with scenes of sex, extreme violence and hedonism recounted in Ellis’ characteristic emotionless, rather minimalist style.  Though the scene is Los Angeles, and the protagonist himself a screen writer, Imperial Bedrooms, it may be said, has crossed over to the very, very dark side when compared to John Fante’s moving 1939 novel  Ask the Dust, part of his tetralogy The Bandini Quartets. (PR)

See our post on Lunar Park by Bret Easton Ellis.

image: Wikipedia

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Book Reviews, Language, Links, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Bandini Quartet – John Fante

Posted by the editors on Friday, 1 July 2011

Ask the Dust, by John Fante

image: Wikipedia

The Bandini Quartet (novels) (1938-1985) by John Fante  The Bandini Quartet is a collection of four novels by John Fante: Wait Until Spring, Bandini (1938), The Road to Los Angeles (1985), Ask the Dust (1939) and Dreams From Bunker Hill (1982), written in a style which may be described as “dirty realism”, and featuring the life and tribulations of first generation Italian-American Arturo Bandini, from young adolescent to disillusioned novelist, short story writer and Hollywood screenwriter.  Boisterous, touching, sharp.  As The New York Times has written, “Either the work of John Fante is unknown to you or it is unforgettable.  He is not the kind of writer to leave room in between.” (Each novel is also available separately)(PR)

David Foster Wallace readers may note that in his 1987 novel The Broom of the System Lavache ‘Stoney’ Beadsman has a wooden leg with a hidden drawer in which he keeps marijuana cigarettes and other illegal substances. Ch. 4 of Ask the Dust refers to a character named Benny Cohen who, “had a wooden leg with a little door in it. Inside the door were marijuana cigarets. He sold them for fifteen cents apiece.”

See our previous posts on David Foster Wallace: The Last Audit – Review of David Foster Wallace’s “The Pale King” by Tom McCarthy, A Self-Help Reader for David Foster Wallace, The Pale King – David Foster Wallace & the Staggering, Multifarious, Cacophonous Predicament, David Foster Wallace – Piecing Together a Posthumous Novel, The Pale King

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Book Reviews, Language, Links, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: