Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Museum of Modern Art’

Willem de Kooning – Unfurling a Life of Creative Exuberance

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 18 September 2011

Pink Angels, 1945, Willem de Kooning

Holland Cotter has written an inspired and inspiring article entitled “Unfurling a Life of Creative Exuberance” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, reviewing the enormous and masterful new MoMA retrospective entitled, appropriately enough, “De Kooning: A Retrospective” (through 9 January 2012 at the Museum of Modern Art; (212) 708-9400, moma.org) which includes paintings, drawings and sculpture created over a period of 70 years.  Cotter looks, with insight, knowledge and clarity, at de Kooning, his “energy-generating” work, and his methods in a way that is informative, easily accessible, and motivating.  All the more reason to make MoMA’s wonderful exhibition a must-see on your fall calendar.

image: Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles; Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Point Omega, by Don DeLillo

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 27 April 2011

PointOmega.jpg

Point Omega, by Don DeLillo

Point Omega (2010) (novel) by Don DeLillo (White Noise (1985), Underworld (1997), The Body Artist (2001), Falling Man (2007)).  Disturbing, masterful, spare; lucid and complex.

According to DeLillo, the novel considers an idea from “…the writing of the Jesuit thinker and paleontologist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.”  The ‘Omega Point’ of the title “…[is] the possible idea that human consciousness is reaching a point of exhaustion and that what comes next may be either a paroxysm or something enormously sublime and unenvisionable.”  (According to Wikipedia, Teilhard makes sense of the universe by its evolutionary process. He interprets complexity as the axis of evolution of matter into a geosphere, a biosphere, into consciousness (in man), and then to supreme consciousness (the Omega Point).  The Omega Point is said to denote the state of  maximum organized complexity (complexity combined with centricity), towards which the universe is evolving.)

 As on knows, omega (the last letter of the Greek alphabet) is often used to denote the last, the end, or the ultimate limit of a set, in contrast to alpha, the first letter of the Greek alphabet. In the New Testament, God is declared to be the “alpha and omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last”. (Wikipedia)

Omega can equally be thought of as the end of death or even time, or as the name of the end; in linguistics, as the phonological word; in textual criticism, as the archetype of a manuscript tradition

At the end of Point Omega, DeLillo, in his “Acknowledgment”, writes: “24 Hour Psycho, a videowork by Douglas Gordon, was first screened in 1993 in Glasgow and Berlin.  It was installed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the summer of 2006.” 24 Hour Psycho is the showing of Alfred Hitchcock‘s classic film thriller Psycho (1960) slowed down from its usual 24 frames per second, 109 minute running time, so that it runs 1440 minutes, or 24 hours, at approximately 2 frames per second.  In Point Omega, the first and last sections of the DeLillo’s novel take place during a showing of 24 Hour Psycho.

24 Hour Psycho, as an artistic creation, deals with themes common to Gordon’s work, such as “recognition and repetition, time and memory, complicity and duplicity, authorship and authenticity, darkness and light”, as one can learn in an piece in The Guardian.  Moreover, the slideshow and text accompanying it, as highly relevant as they are to DeLillo’s work, are fascinating in their own right.

With respect to the first edition cover of Point Omega, one could wonder at the presence of the sign for infinity, given the accepted literal and symbolic understanding of “omega” as, truly, the end.  Conscious choice and interesting implications of infinite endings, or even, the end of infinity?  Amusing joke?  Artist’s choice?  Coincidence? (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library.

Omega uc lc.svg

images: Wikipedia

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Posted in Art, Book Reviews, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, film, General, Installations, Language, Links, Literature, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Artist as Obstreperous Rebel & Sardonic Social Commentator – “German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse” at MoMA

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 26 March 2011

Erich Heckel’s “Franzi Reclining”, 1910.  Part of MoMA’s extraordinary collection of German Expressionism prints.

image: Museum of Modern Art, New York

Roberta Smith has written a wonderful, lively and informative article entitled “Bleak Visions From Early-20th-Century Rebels” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the highly colorful and intensely graphic exhibition “German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse”  at the Museum of Moder Art (open to the public Sunday 27 March – 11 July, 2011, (212) 708-9400, moma.org).  Smith describes the show as, among other things, “infused with an urgent, crackling energy, by turns joyful, satiric, grim and tragic”, easily motivation enough for one to see it. 

However, for those of us who, for some reason, won’t be in New York between tomorrow and 11 July, MoMA has announced that as of Sunday all 3,380 German Expressionist works on paper in its collection will become available for online viewing at moma.org/germanexpressionism.  Amazing, and excellent.

In the meantime, great slideshow, here. 

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London’s Tate Modern – Who Am I?

Posted by the editors on Monday, 21 March 2011

The Tate Modern in London by Herzog and de Meuron, 2001

image: galinsky.com – Google

Kati Krause has written a very interesting and informative article entitled “Tate Modern Finds Its Match – New director Chris Dercon wants to redefine the role of the public museum”  in the Arts & Entertainment section of The Wall Street Journal (online), looking at the role of contemporary art museums, in general, and, much more specifically, the role of London’s Tate Modern, as seen by its new director, Chris Dercon, formerly of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in New York, now MoMA PS1, the Witte de With contemporary art museum in Rotterdam, the Boijmans Van Beuningen, also in Rotterdam and Haus der Kunst in Munich.  Dynamic, active, engaged.

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Business, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, performance art, Photography, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Pablo Picasso – Guitar Hero

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 13 February 2011

“Still Life with Guitar”, Pablo Picasso, at the Museum of Modern Art, in New York

image: Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times

Holland Cotter has written a very interesting article entitled “When Picasso Changed His Tune” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the exhibition “Picasso: Guitars 1912-1914” at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (February 13 through June 6; (212) 708-9400; moma.org) and the origins of the Cubist movement.  The exhibition brings together work never seen since leaving Picasso’s studio, rare, privately owned work and work owned by various international art museums to create a truly moving and masterful exhibition.  Cotter is, and we all should be, on cloud nine.

More than simply “a must see”.

Excellent slide show, here.

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Posted in Art, Collage, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, nothingisinvisible, painting, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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