Nothing Is Invisible

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Posts Tagged ‘modern art’

Infectiously Playful – Anthony Caro on the Roof of the Metropolitan

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 30 April 2011

Anthony Caro, Early One Morning (1962) Painted steel and aluminium

Ken Johnson has written “On the Met’s Roof Garden, Sculpture at Play”, an article in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the venerable Bristish sculptor Anthony Caro, his ebullient, “anything-is-possible” sculptures of the early 1960s, of which the above “Early One Morning” (1962) is certainly a wonderful example, and the exhibition on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA) in New York entitled “Anthony Caro on the Roof” (through 30 October at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; (212) 535-7710; metmuseum.org).  Johnson writes of the, perhaps thwarting, effects of art critic Clement Greenberg‘s hyperbolic praise on Caro’s work after the mid-1960s, and laments the fact that work such as “Early One Morning“, above, are not included in the Met’s show.  Happily, what Johnson terms Caro’s “break-out” sculpture, “Midday“, below, is part of the show.  Its gleaming taxi-cab yellow should be right at home in the blaring, dynamic wonder that is New York City.

Here’s an excerpt from what the Metropolitan says about the exhibition:

Sculptures by Anthony Caro (b. 1924)—who is considered the most influential and prolific British sculptor of his generation and a key figure in the development of modernist sculpture over the last sixty years—are featured in the 2011 installation on The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The installation includes a selection of sculpture in steel, painted and unpainted, spanning the artist’s career to date and highlighting principal aspects of his long career: engagement with form in space, dialogue between sculpture and architecture, and creation of new, abstract analogies for the human figure and landscape.

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the first exhibition of steel sculpture by the artist, who lives and works in London. The large-scale works on view this summer are Midday, 1960 (Museum of Modern Art, New York), After Summer, 1968 (Collection of Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto), Odalisque, 1984 (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), Blazon, 1987–90 (Courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York and Annely Juda Fine Art, London), and End Up, 2010 (Collection of the artist, courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York). The installation is situated in the Museum’s dramatic open-air space offering unparalleled views of Central Park and the New York City skyline.

“Midday”, Anthony Caro, 1960, included in the rooftop exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

image: top, © Barford Sculptures Ltd/Tate, London 2009/venicebiennale.britishcouncil.org; bottom, Anthony Caro/artinfo.com

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Thinking Outside the Canvas – Blinky Palermo Retrospective

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 28 April 2011

Composition With 8 Red Rectangles” (1964), by Blinky Palermo at the Hirshhorn Museum

The wonderful art critic  Roberta Smith has written another excellent, fascinating and perceptive article, entitled “Thinking Outside the Canvas” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the impressive retrospective exhibition of work by the late German painter Blinky Palermo, entitled “Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977” at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington DC (through 15 May 2011, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & Seventh Street, SW, Washington; (202) 633-1000, hirshhorn.si.edu).  “…intractably consistent and endlessly malleable…”

According to the Hirshhorn in their online notes for the exhibition:

“Blinky Palermo (born Peter Schwartze) continually expanded the definition of painting throughout his career. The exhibition reflects this progression, following a loose chronology based on his four main bodies of work. Early works illustrate his evolution away from traditional materials while he continued to employ Modernism’s bold colors and geometric forms. Starting in 1964, Palermo’s “Stoffbilder” (Cloth Pictures) composed of sewn, horizontal strips of commercially available, solid-colored fabric mounted on stretchers, take cues from advertising and fashion of the time. The artist continued to toy with decoration and its intersection with Modernism through site-specific wall paintings, which he carefully documented with preparatory drawings and installation photographs. A number of these framed documents form the third section of the exhibition. The final phase of Palermo’s career is represented by his “Metallbilder” (Metal Pictures). An outgrowth of the previous Cloth Pictures, this series of acrylic paintings on metal culminates with “To the People of New York City” (1976), a tribute to the city the artist loved and called home from 1973 to 1976 and where he maintained a studio until his sudden death at age 33. Part of Dia’s collection and on long-term view at Dia: Beacon, this multi-panel installation is traveling for the first time.”

image: Jens Ziehe/Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y., VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/The New York Times

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Kurt Schwitters – One of Modernism’s Signal Outsiders

Posted by the editors on Friday, 1 April 2011

Mz 601, a 1923 collage from the exhibition “Kurt Schwitters: Color and Collage” at the Princeton University Art Museum (image: Kurt and Ernst Schwitters Foundation, Hannover, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/The New York Times)

Holland Cotter has written a very good, very interesting article entitled “Versatile Collagist, Dangerous Times” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the fascinating, difficult life, and precise, urgent work of the collagist Kurt Schwitters, and reviewing the current exhibition entitled “Kurt Schwitters: Color and Collage” at the Princeton University Art Museum (Princeton, N.J., through 26 June 2011, (609)258-3788, artmuseum.princeton.edu. The exhibition then travels to the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum).  Schwitters’ graphic sensibility, heartfelt meticulousness and personal diversity are nothing if not inspiring.

Excellent slideshow, here.

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Alive with Color & Rhythm – Color Moves: Art & Fashion by Sonia Delaunay

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 19 March 2011

Rythme, 1938, by Sonia Delaunay

image: Wikipedia

The Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum (2 East 91st Street, Manhattan; (212) 849-8400) exhibition entitled “Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay” (18 March-5 June 2011) is a wonderful opportunity to admire, and be moved by, the beautiful, dynamic work of the artist Sonia Delaunay (1885-1979).

According to the Cooper-Hewitt:

Known primarily as an abstract painter and colorist, Sonia Delaunay applied her talents and theories to all areas of visual expression, including graphics, interiors, theater and film, fashion and textiles. A trademark of Delaunay’s work is the sense of movement and rhythm created by the simultaneous contrasts of certain colors. This exhibition will focus on fashion designs from her own Atelier Simultané in Paris during the 1920s, as well as textiles designed for the Metz & Co. department store in Amsterdam in the 1930s. On view will be examples of designs, textiles, garments and photographs from the Musée des Arts Decoratifs, Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris, the Musée de l’Impression sur Etoffes in Mulhouse, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France and private collections around Europe and the United States.

Roberta Smith has written a fascinating, color-packed, and upbeat article entitled “Swatches Illuminate a Painter’s Other Art” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the Cooper-Hewitt exhibition as well as Delaunay’s life.  Delaunay, herself, said, “I have lived my art,” and how full of life her art is.

The always-interesting design blog, Design Milk, has a short article, with an abundance of wonderful images, on the exhibition, here.

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, fashion, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, Textiles | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Tweets, Likes, Art & Museums – Museums, Social Media & Technology

Posted by the editors on Friday, 18 March 2011

Twitter.com

image: twitter.com

Carol Vogel has written an interesting article entitled “The Spirit of Sharing” as part of the the Museums Special Section of the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the use of the Internet in general, and social media, in particular, by a number of renowned museums in the U.S. and abroad.

And here is a link to a very dynamic site, artbabble.org, where, at last count, 17 museums offer up an interesting diversity of video…

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Education, Exhibitions, General, Internet, Links, marketing, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, performance art, Photography, sculpture, Social Media, Technology, video, Websites | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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