Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Man Booker Prize’

* Book Review: Pulse by Julian Barnes

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 29 January 2012

Book Review: Pulse (2011)(collection of short stories) by Julian Barnes (Flaubert’s Parrot (1984, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), England, England (1998, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), Arthur & George (2005, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), The Sense of an Ending (2011, winner of the Booker Prize).  Pulse is a collection of wonderful short stories taking the pulse of couples, and in which couples are the pulse, the life blood.  From parents, to newly weds, to first dates, to esoteric historical, from sharp, well-to-do couples, to once-hippie aging couples, to ’til-death-do-us-part couples, to couples divorcing within a year of marriage, from hetero to homo, from love to sex, from complicity to antagonism, from no-strings to all things, Pulse throws its net wide, not that there aren’t an infinity of couples outside of the net, each being, by definition unique, and unfathomable, no matter what we know.  In fact, what is love?  And, to paraphrase and twist, a bit, Raymond Carver, what (don’t) we talk about when we (don’t) talk about love; pain, fun, sharing, loss, thrill, support, tenderness and grief. A must-read for anyone who is, was, or will be part of a couple, or ever wished, or regretted, that they were part of a couple.  And for those solitaries who just wonder about it all.  Marvelous, thoughtful, entertaining and more. (PR)

See our post on the collection of short stories by Raymond Carver, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.

We recommend that you buy you books.  Have a wonderful personal library..  Here are links to amazon.com:

top image: The Guardian

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Heliopolis

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 20 November 2011

Heliopolis (2009)(Novel)  by James Scudamore (Amnesia Clinic (2007))    Heliopolis, firstly, is not a science fiction or fantasy novel; in fact, the novel is named after one of the favelas in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and is the story of one young paulistano‘s adventures through contemporary Sao Paolo’s exotic cuisine, dense pollution, denser traffic, and extremes of urban poverty and wealth in his search for identity.  Scudamore has a deft touch for sensory description, be it food or environment, that is a pleasure to read.  Yet Heliopolis, his second novel, and long-listed for the 2009 Booker Prize, seems wanting: though the characters are interesting, their relationships are inadequatelydeveloped and the plot seems shallow and too “neatly” treated. (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library..   Here is a link to amazon.com:

top image: The Guardian

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Child 44

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 13 August 2011

Child 44, a thriller by Tom Rob Smith

Child 44 (novel) (2008) by Tom Rob Smith     Child 44, Tom Rob Smith’s first novel and the first book of a trilogy (the second, The Secret Speech (2009), the third to be published in 2011) is an acclaimed thriller set in the late Stalinist era in the Soviet Union, based on the true story of Ukrainian serial killer Andrei Chikatilo, and also exploring the era’s secret police, mental institutions, orphanages and homosexuality, among other subjects.  Janet Maslin, in The New York Times, called Child 44 a “tightly woven”, “ingeniously plotted”, “high-voltage story”.  Child 44 was named on the long list for the 2008 Man Booker Prize.  (PR)

image: The Sunday Telegraph

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Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 26 March 2011

Nocturnes.jpg

Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall, by Kazui Ishiguro, first edition cover

Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall (2009) by Kazuo Ishiguro.  A collection of short stories, or more precisely, a story-cycle, Ishiguro’s first, after five novels, including A Pale View of Hills (1982), and The Remains of the Day (1989), awarded the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 1989. ( A film adaptation of The Remains of the Day, made in 1993 and starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, was nominated for eight Academy Awards.)  Nocturnes’ stories all have, as a thematic element, musicians, music and, perhaps to a lesser extent, nightfall.  They are all well-written and vary from amusing to comic, sad to annoying, with an often trying dose of absurdity. (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library..

top image: Wikipedia

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UK’s Man-Booker Prize Awarded To “Contemporary Historical” Novel “Wolf Hall” by Hilary Mantel

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 7 October 2009

No great surprise here (though still far from a unanimous vote) as you’ll read in the article entitled “Novel About Henry VIII Wins Booker Prize” by Motoko Rich, in the Books section of The New York Times (online).

Great fans of J.M. Coetzee, we nevertheless agree to accept Mantel’s “Wolf Hall” as the official winner.

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