Nothing Is Invisible

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Posts Tagged ‘Ken Johnson’

“Real/Surreal” at The Whitney – Jewels of Uneasiness, Faithfully Rendered

Posted by the editors on Monday, 7 November 2011

Ken Johnson has written an interesting and probing article entitled “Jewels of Uneasiness, Faithfully Rendered”, itself a rather evocative title, in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the show “Real/Surreal” (through 12 February 2012 at the Whitney Museum of American Art; (212) 570-3600, whitney.org). “Real/Surreal”, works from the Whitney’s permanent collection, is an exhibition of American art from the 1920s to the 1950s: a haunting, disenchanted, uncomfortably dream-like body of work, and a significant predecessor to the energy-filled creations of Abstract Expressionism.  Johnson proposes a resurgence of context: Depression, ecological cataclysm, war, loss of moral referents, in attempting to understand and find the roots of today’s rekindled interest in Surrealism.

top image: Edward Hopper ‘s “Early Sunday Morning” (1930), from “Real/Surreal”/Whitney Museum of American Art/The New York Times

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Infectiously Playful – Anthony Caro on the Roof of the Metropolitan

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 30 April 2011

Anthony Caro, Early One Morning (1962) Painted steel and aluminium

Ken Johnson has written “On the Met’s Roof Garden, Sculpture at Play”, an article in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the venerable Bristish sculptor Anthony Caro, his ebullient, “anything-is-possible” sculptures of the early 1960s, of which the above “Early One Morning” (1962) is certainly a wonderful example, and the exhibition on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA) in New York entitled “Anthony Caro on the Roof” (through 30 October at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; (212) 535-7710; metmuseum.org).  Johnson writes of the, perhaps thwarting, effects of art critic Clement Greenberg‘s hyperbolic praise on Caro’s work after the mid-1960s, and laments the fact that work such as “Early One Morning“, above, are not included in the Met’s show.  Happily, what Johnson terms Caro’s “break-out” sculpture, “Midday“, below, is part of the show.  Its gleaming taxi-cab yellow should be right at home in the blaring, dynamic wonder that is New York City.

Here’s an excerpt from what the Metropolitan says about the exhibition:

Sculptures by Anthony Caro (b. 1924)—who is considered the most influential and prolific British sculptor of his generation and a key figure in the development of modernist sculpture over the last sixty years—are featured in the 2011 installation on The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The installation includes a selection of sculpture in steel, painted and unpainted, spanning the artist’s career to date and highlighting principal aspects of his long career: engagement with form in space, dialogue between sculpture and architecture, and creation of new, abstract analogies for the human figure and landscape.

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the first exhibition of steel sculpture by the artist, who lives and works in London. The large-scale works on view this summer are Midday, 1960 (Museum of Modern Art, New York), After Summer, 1968 (Collection of Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto), Odalisque, 1984 (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), Blazon, 1987–90 (Courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York and Annely Juda Fine Art, London), and End Up, 2010 (Collection of the artist, courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York). The installation is situated in the Museum’s dramatic open-air space offering unparalleled views of Central Park and the New York City skyline.

“Midday”, Anthony Caro, 1960, included in the rooftop exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

image: top, © Barford Sculptures Ltd/Tate, London 2009/venicebiennale.britishcouncil.org; bottom, Anthony Caro/artinfo.com

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, jazz, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory in New York

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 6 March 2011

“Light II,” in resin by Rachel Whiteread, winner of the Turner Prize in 1993, at Luhring Augustine booth at The Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory in New York

image: Luhring Augustine/The New York Times

Ken Johnson has written an interesting article, a small survey of sorts, entitled “The Uncluttered Look Has Its Day” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at The Art Dealers Association of America show “The Art Show” (clever title!) at the Park Avenue Armory in New York (through Sunday at the Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, at 67th Street; (212) 616-3930, artdealers.org).  And, though it is clearly the most conservative of the shows in New York’s unofficial “Art Week”, that doesn’t mean you won’t find some wonderful art.

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

His Shaggy World (and Welcome to It) – Exhibitions of the Work of Edward Koren, Cartoonist for The New Yorker Since 1962

Posted by the editors on Friday, 21 May 2010

Edward Koren/Wallach Art Gallery/The New York Times

“We can’t tell if it’s a malfunction or a dysfunction”, Edward Koren (1991).

Ken Johnson has written an amusing article (how could it not be?) entitled “His Shaggy World (and Welcome to It)” in the Art Review section of the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at two shows featuring the work of the artist/illustrator/cartoonist Edward Koren, known for his work for The New Yorker magazine, since 1962.

Ah, yes, dysfunction.

“Edward Koren: The Capricious Line” through June 12 at the Wallach Art Gallery, Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University, Morningside Heights; (212) 854-7288, columbia.edu/cu/wallach. “Edward Koren: Parallel Play, Drawings 1979-2010” through June 2 at the Luise Ross Gallery, 511 West 25th Street, Chelsea; (212) 343-2161, luiserossgallery.com.

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Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Art – “Remember That You Will Die: Death Across Cultures”

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 8 May 2010

Science Museum, London/The New York Times

Remember That You Will Die, at the Rubin Museum of Art, includes this ivory head of General Wallenstein, made between 1750 and 1850

Ken Johnson has written an article entitled “Mulling Mortality, in the East and in the West” in the Art Review section of the Art & Design section of The New York Times (online) which looks at the exhibition entitled “Remember That You Will Die: Death Across Cultures”, an exhibition at the Rubin Museum of Art (150 West 17th Street, NYC) through 9 August 2010, which, through 82 works, highlights profound differences in what death means through different cultures and different epochs featuring traditional Tibetan objects, medieval and early Renaissance European pieces and one contemporary work, a video by the American artist Bill Viola entitled “Three Women”, being shown in NY for the first time.
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Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, painting, sculpture, video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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