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Posts Tagged ‘Francis Ford Coppola’

* Dementia 13 – The first feature film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 11 February 2012

Dementia 13 (1963)  Written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather (1972), Apocalypse Now (1979), Youth Without Youth (2007)), starring William Campbell (Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964)), Luana Anders (Night Tide (1961), That Cold Day in the Park (1969)) and Patrick Magee (A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975)).  Dementia 13, a horror thriller, and the first feature film directed by the immense Francis Ford Coppola, is, at best, at pseudo-quasi-Hitchcockian psychological thriller, with a screenplay, written by Coppola, that is extraordinarily fragmented, if not desperately lost in its loose ends.  Nevertheless, as Coppola’s first feature directorial effort, at the very least, and thanks to some wonderfully moody directing of scenes in an ancient, and haunted, Scottish castle, and a clear feel for the building of psycho-thriller tension, Dementia 13 is a must-see for any fan of Coppola, B-movie psychology, or, in fact, kitsch. Perhaps the promotional film poster says it all. (PR)

See our post on the film Youth Without Youth, written, directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola.

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The Great Gatsby

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 26 July 2011

The cover of the first edition of The SAM SCHMIDT, 1925.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1st edition cover, 1925

The Great Gatsby (novel) (1925) by F. Scott Fitzgerald (This Side of Paradise (1920), The Beautiful and Damned  (1922), Tender Is the Night (1934), The Last Tycoon – originally The Love of the Last Tycoon (posthumously, 1941)) Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is, of course, the marvelous, constant best-selling literary classic, set in 1922 in the exclusive communities of Long Island, and almost systematically taught in U.S. schools as an example of The Great American Novel, and is, to this day, always worth rereading.  The Great Gatsby was, as you surely know, made into a very good film of the same name starring the excellent Robert Redford and Mia Farrow with the screenplay by Francis Ford Coppola and Vladimir Nabokov.  (PR)

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Youth Without Youth

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 23 April 2011

Youth Without Youth theatrical release poster

image: Wikipedia

Youth Without Youth (2007) (DVD) Directed by Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather (1972), Apocalypse Now (1979), Twixt Now and Sunrise (to be released in 2011)), starring Tim Roth (Reservoir Dogs (1992), Pulp Fiction (1994), Funny Games (2008)), Alexandra Maria Lara (The Reader (2008)), Bruno Ganz (The Boys from Brazil (1978), Wings of Desire (1987), The Reader (2008)), with a very brief participation by Matt Damon (Saving Private Ryan (1998), Syriana (2005),  The Adjustment Bureau (2011)).

Magical Realism, Surrealism, Science Fiction of a sort, politico-religious intellectual mish-mash?  One could suppose that a kind of Magical Realism best describes Coppola’s style in Youth Without Youth, keeping in mind that Coppola not only directed the film but was also its producer and writer, the film being based on the autobiographically inspired novella of the same name by the Romanian author, religion scholar, and extreme-right political supporter, Mircea Eliade (1907-1986) .

An interesting film, at least in theory, Youth Without Youth, falls flat through relatively poor acting, except on the part of Bruno Ganz, as well as poor writing.  Not to mention the dubious novella from which it is drawn.  Nevertheless, it is a Francis Ford Coppola film, and as such merits watching.  Perhaps. (PR)

We recommend that you buy your DVDs and Blu-ray disks.  Have a wonderful personal library.


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