Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Carol Vogel’

True to His Abstraction – Ellsworth Kelly – An Explorer of Shape, Line and Color

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 22 January 2012

Carol Vogel has written a very interesting article entitled “True to His Abstraction” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the work of the abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly, his painting, sculptures, reliefs and prints, and his life-long focus on abstraction.  Sharp, aware, inspiring and vibrant, Kelly, 88 years old, offers some fascinating commentary on his work, and the work of others, and is, in many ways, an exemplary artist’s artist, dedicated to his vision, despite the vicissitudes of the art market and the art-star status of many of his contemporaries.

The article includes an excellent slideshow, here.

See our post Ellsworth Kelly – Reliefs 2009-2010 & Black & White Drawings – His Own Richest Source of Inspiration

top image: Ellsworth Kelly/Matthew Marks Gallery, The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Pop Art, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Still Unearthing Discoveries in de Kooning’s Brush Strokes

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 14 September 2011

Carol Vogel has written an excellent article, entitled “Still Unearthing Discoveries in de Kooning’s Brush Strokes”, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at the work of the brilliant Abstract Expressionist painter Willem de Kooning and the work, and fascinating discoveries, by John Elderfield, the MoMA‘s chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture, as he immersed himself in the work of Willem de Kooning in preparation for the massive show at MoMA, “de Kooning: A Retrospective”, opening 18 September 2011.  From Casper The Friendly Ghost, to stenography, to Life Magazine, and more.

image: Librado Romero/The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Tweets, Likes, Art & Museums – Museums, Social Media & Technology

Posted by the editors on Friday, 18 March 2011

Twitter.com

image: twitter.com

Carol Vogel has written an interesting article entitled “The Spirit of Sharing” as part of the the Museums Special Section of the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the use of the Internet in general, and social media, in particular, by a number of renowned museums in the U.S. and abroad.

And here is a link to a very dynamic site, artbabble.org, where, at last count, 17 museums offer up an interesting diversity of video…

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Education, Exhibitions, General, Internet, Links, marketing, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, performance art, Photography, sculpture, Social Media, Technology, video, Websites | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Conceptual Art with Grit – Glenn Ligon Retrospective at the Whitney in New York – Politically Provocative & Beautiful to Behold

Posted by the editors on Friday, 4 March 2011

“Warm Broad Glow,” by Glenn Ligon, in a 2005 installation, is being reconfigured for his Whitney retrospective

image: Whitney Museum/The New York Times

Carol Vogel has written an interesting article entitled “The Inside Story on Outsiderness” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times about the conceptual artist and painter Glenn Ligon and his upcoming retrospective Glenn Ligon: AMERICA” at the Whitney Museum in New York City (10 March 2011 – 5 June 2011, 945 Madison Ave. at 75th St., New York, NY 10021, (212) 570-3600)

  As the Whitney puts it:

“Glenn Ligon: AMERICA is the first comprehensive mid-career retrospective devoted to this pioneering New York–based artist. Throughout his career, Ligon (b. 1960) has pursued an incisive exploration of American history, literature, and society across a body of work that builds critically on the legacies of modern painting and more recent conceptual art. He is best known for his landmark series of text-based paintings, made since the late 1980s, which draw on the writings and speech of diverse figures including Jean Genet, Zora Neale Hurston, Jesse Jackson, and Richard Pryor. Ligon’s subject matter ranges widely from the Million Man March and the aftermath of slavery to 1970s coloring books and the photography of Robert Mapplethorpe—all treated within artworks that are both politically provocative and beautiful to behold.

This exhibition features roughly one hundred works, including paintings, prints, photography, drawings, and sculptural installations, as well as striking recent neon reliefs, one newly commissioned for the Whitney’s Madison Avenue windows. Ligon’s most iconic works will be presented alongside previously unexhibited early paintings and drawings, which will shed new light on his artistic origins. The exhibition is accompanied by an amply illustrated catalogue that examines Ligon’s working methods in the context of American culture more broadly. Yourself in the World, a companion volume published by the Whitney and Yale University Press, collects Ligon’s lively interviews and trenchant essays on topics ranging from pop culture and the work of young artists to the first post-Katrina Biennial in New Orleans.

Glenn Ligon: AMERICA is organized by Whitney curator Scott Rothkopf. The exhibition travels to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in the fall of 2011 and to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth in early 2012.”

It’s never too late to be provoked, nor to behold beauty, nor, for that matter, to learn more about conceptual art.

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Posted in Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Language, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Whitney Museum Board OKs Renzo Piano-Designed Downtown Building to Open in 2015

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 30 May 2010

Image The New York Times

The Renzo Piano-designed downtown Whitney will be a six-story building adjacent to the High Line Park in Manhattan’s Meat Packing District.

Carol Vogel has written an article entitled “Whitney Museum Plans New Building Downtown” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times (online) looking at the approval by the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Board of Directors to build, beginning in one year, and scheduled to open in 2015, a new, much larger facility designed by Renzo Piano, adjacent to the High Line Park in the Meat Packing district of New York City.  The future of the museum’s current Marcel Breuer-designed upper east side Manhattan building, opened when the Whitney’s permanent collection numbered 2000 works, and much too small to expose more than an miniscule portion of its now 18000 work-strong collection,  may very well entail a joint venture with Metropolitan Museum of Art.

See our sister blog, designalog, for a  post on the Renzo Piano-designed addition to the Kimbell Art Museum to open in 2013, for more on Piano’s museum designs, here.

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Business, culture, Environment, Exhibitions, General, Links, money, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, painting, performance art, Photography, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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