Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘British Writers’

* Books: Started Early, Took My Dog by Kate Atkinson

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 18 February 2012

Books: Started Early, Took My Dog (2010) by Kate Atkinson (Behind the Scenes at the Museum (1995), Human Croquet (1997)).  This crime novel, part thoughtful travelogue, of loves and losses, follows semi-retired private investigator Jackson Brodie as he attempts to trace, through the good, bad old days and the precariously, obliquely good, bad new days, the origins of a client, adopted a young age.  More than touching on a diversity of themes: of adoption, of dogs that belonged to women, of shockingly, rashly, bought children, of kidnapped, history-less children, of forcibly orphaned children; of adaptation to ever-changing circumstances, and glimpses of true, and erroneous, self-knowledge; confusion of names; childhood, the good, and, so often, the bad, the thwarted, the difficult and the ugly; parents and children and families in all their stifled hope, errors, lies, and miscommunications; not to mention inspiring, uplifting, dark and hopeful poetry; and of course, crime, with its police, private investigators, cover-ups, murders, power and money.  Sounds like a lot?  It is.  But with Atkinson’s deft, even tender touch, and her sensitive portrayals, Started Early, Took My Dog, is an easy, captivating novel, and a very agreeable, if at times brutal, read. (PR)

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top image:  The Guardian

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Book Reviews: London Fields by Martin Amis

Posted by the editors on Monday, 9 January 2012

Book Reviews: London Fields (1989) by Martin Amis (Night Train (1997), Yellow Dog (2003), The Pregnant Widow (2010).  This black comedy murder mystery set in 1999 in London, Amis’ sixth novel, is thought by many to be his best, and a masterpiece of London fiction.  With a truly end-of-the-world setting, impending nuclear doom, environmental chaos, violence, and hopelessness, London Fields offers, frankly, little cheer, though it does offer Amis a chance to write in his superb, sharp, inspired, descriptive style.  There are wonderful character descriptions and a fine ear for London’s multi-cultural street talk, and its social disparities, from truly seedy pubs, to City bankers’ splendid homes.  Comedy, satire and symbolism are given full reign, and in fact, the symbolism does at times get heavy-handed.  A millennium novel full of sex, violence, the questioning of literary, media, and other, reliability, impending disaster, and darts (yes, darts), London Fields is an essential read, of course, for all fans of Martin Amis, and for those interested in dynamic, contemporary writing, who don’t mind an overdose, perhaps, of symbolism. (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library..  Here is a link to amazon.com:

top image: Wikipedia

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Walking to Hollywood

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Walking to Hollywood (2010)(Novel) by Will Self (How the Dead Live (2000), The Book of Dave (2006), The Butt (2008))   Walking to Hollywood, a triptych of fictional memoirs, overflowing with savvy wordplay, unreliable narrators, and absurdity, looks at, in Self’s own words, “displacements of a single phenomenon” and yes, walking is a central element throughout.  Part one, “Very Little“, looks at the relationship between an artist and his art; Part two, “Walking to Hollywood“, looks at the ‘death of cinema’; Part three, “Spurn Head“, is the story of a writer’s walk along the east Yorkshire coast.  All are fascinating, Part three, “Spurn Head“, especially so, part two “Walking to Hollywood” is, though, at times, difficult to get through.  Self, himself, has written an afterword, and though respect is due the author for choosing to have his fictional work “do his talking”, the afterword is truly very helpful, a bit after the fact.  In it, Self states, impressively succinctly, especially in light of the preceding stories, his inspiration, motivation and central focus: Part one: “Very Little“, obsessive-compulsive disorder; Part two: “Walking to Hollywood“, psychosis; and Part Three: “Spurn Head“, Alzheimer’s Disease.  I don’t believe that I’m giving away any information that will diminish, in any way, Walking to Hollywood, by divulging Self’s motivations…on the contrary.  An impressive work. (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library..

top image: Wikipedia

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Child 44

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 13 August 2011

Child 44, a thriller by Tom Rob Smith

Child 44 (novel) (2008) by Tom Rob Smith     Child 44, Tom Rob Smith’s first novel and the first book of a trilogy (the second, The Secret Speech (2009), the third to be published in 2011) is an acclaimed thriller set in the late Stalinist era in the Soviet Union, based on the true story of Ukrainian serial killer Andrei Chikatilo, and also exploring the era’s secret police, mental institutions, orphanages and homosexuality, among other subjects.  Janet Maslin, in The New York Times, called Child 44 a “tightly woven”, “ingeniously plotted”, “high-voltage story”.  Child 44 was named on the long list for the 2008 Man Booker Prize.  (PR)

image: The Sunday Telegraph

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