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Posts Tagged ‘Brief Interviews with Hideous Men’

City of Industry – Starring Harvey Keitel

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 30 November 2011

City of Industry (1997)(DVD)  Directed by John Irvin (The Dogs of War (1980), Turtle Diary (1985), Robin Hood (1991)), starring Harvey Keitel (Taxi Driver (1976), Bugsy (1991), Reservoir Dogs (1992), The Piano (1993), Pulp Fiction (1994)), with Famke Janssen (GoldenEye (1995), X-Men (2000), X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), Bringing Up Bobby (2011)), Stephen Dorff (Public Enemies (2009)), Timothy Hutton (Ordinary People (1980), Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (2009), The Ghost Writer (2010)), and Lucy Liu (Jerry Maguire (1996), Charlie’s Angels (2000), Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003), Lucky Number Slevin (2006)), with a uncredited cameo by Elliott Gould (M*A*S*H (1970), The Long Goodbye (1973), Ocean’s Eleven (2001)Ocean’s Twelve (2004)Ocean’s Thirteen (2007), Contagion (2011)).  City of Industry, a crime drama of betrayal and revenge, often said to be influenced by Heat, a 1995 crime drama directed by Michael Mann and starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Val Kilmer, is, unfortunately, somewhat of a disappointment.  Keitel is very good camping Keitel, dead-pan, blunt or groaning; Stephen Dorff is mono-dimensional, nasty and stupid, with terrible hair; Timothy Hutton appears to be, frankly, in the wrong movie.  And so one is all the more pleased to see Famke Janssen, tall, lost, sexy and jangly, just so, and Lucy Liu, however briefly, impenetrable and even sexier, not to mention an uncredited, and equally brief, amusing appearance by Elliott Gould as a loan-shark.  Admittedly however, the writing leaves a great deal to be desired, as does the directing and the music really doesn’t work at all.  What is interesting, though, is the wonderfully multi-ethnic – Chinese, Black, Hispanic, White – nature of the criminals and their gangs, all brutal, blood-thirsty and slow-witted. (PR)

See our post on the wonderfully entertaining 1973 film starring Elliott Gould, The Long Goodbye.

We recommend that you buy your DVDs.  Have a great personal film library..  Here are links to amazon.com:

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Posted in DVDs, film, Film Reviews, General, Movies, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Changing My Mind – Occasional Essays, by Zadie Smith

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 24 April 2011

Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays ustrated]

 Changing My Mind – Occasional Essays by Zadie Smith

Changing My Mind – Occasional Essays (2009) (Collection of essays) by Zadie Smith (White Teeth (2000), The Autograph Man (2002), On Beauty (2005), and numerous essays for The Guardian, The New Yorker and other newspapers and magazines).

With essays on Hepburn and Garbo, to David Foster Wallace, from an Academy Award weekend in Los Angeles to E.M. Forster, Roland Barthes, Vladimir Nabokov, Tom McCarthy and a great deal more, and with a tone from travel documentary to insightful literary analysis, and most everything in between, Zadie Smith has offered us the opportunity to see how her mind works, and how she not only permits herself to change it, but even makes that her motto, shall we say.  There’s some very good writing here, and some, on the other hand, a bit difficult to get through, but well worth the effort required.  Smith can be extraordinarily perceptive, subtle, keen, as well as, perhaps, naively hopeful, even silly, and that, in itself, is marvelous and refreshing, intellectually challenging and agreeably human.

Her long essay on David Foster Wallace, entitled “Brief Interviews with Hideous Men: The Difficult Gifts of David Foster Wallace” is honestly excellent. (PR)

See our previous post on Zadie Smith, David Foster Wallace and Tom McCarthy, entitled “The Last Audit – Review of David Foster Wallace’s “The Pale King” by Tom McCarthy“, here.

Smith prefaces her book, which is dedicated to her father, with the two following quotes:

“The time to make your mind up about people is never!” (Tracy Lord, played by Katherine Hepburn, in The Philadelphia Story (1940), also starring Cary Grant and James Stewart; directed by George Cukor.)

“You get to decide what to worship.”  (David Foster Wallace)

Pankaj Mishra’s review of Changing My Mind – Occasional Essays, entitled “Other Voices, Other Selves” in the Sunday Book Review section of The New York Times, here.

Peter Conrad’s review of Smith’s book in The Guardian is aptly titled “Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays by Zadie Smith” and is found, here.

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library.

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