Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Arts’

* Art: Museum & Gallery Shows: Laying the Tracks Others Followed – Frank Stella’s Early Work at L&M Arts, by Roberta Smith

Posted by the editors on Friday, 27 April 2012

Art: Museum & Gallery Shows: Laying the Tracks Others Followed – Frank Stella’s Early Work at L&M Arts, by Roberta Smith:  The wonderfully sharp, perceptive Roberta Smith has written a review of the exhibition “Frank Stella: Black, Aluminum, Copper Paintings,” at L&M Arts gallery in New York, (through 2 June 2012).  Simply wonderful..

image: 2012 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Tom Powel Imaging, L&M Arts; article: Roberta Smith, The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Expressionism, Exhibitions, General, Minimalism, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

On Helen Frankenthaler & John Chamberlain – Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom, by Roberta Smith

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 December 2011

The thoughtful and astute art critic Roberta Smith, has written a short article entitled “Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the similarities and differences between the works of the artists Helen Frankenthaler and John Chamberlain, who both, sadly, passed away very recently.  Smith’s sensitive and sharp mind and feeling for their work offers a discrete eulogy for two great American artists, their work’s importance in the transition from Abstract Expressionism, and the continued repercussions of their techniques and sensibilities even today.

Grace Glueck has also written a very fine article entitled “Helen Frankenthaler, Abstract Painter Who Shaped a Movement, Dies at 83” this time, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at, in more detail, the beautiful and pioneering work of Frankenthaler.

An excellent slideshow accompanies the article, here.

See our previous post on Helen Frankenthaler, Helen Frankenthaler – 30 Years of More Than Colorfield at Knoedler & Co.

top image: Mountains and Sea, by Helen Frankenthaler: Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Still Unearthing Discoveries in de Kooning’s Brush Strokes

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 14 September 2011

Carol Vogel has written an excellent article, entitled “Still Unearthing Discoveries in de Kooning’s Brush Strokes”, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at the work of the brilliant Abstract Expressionist painter Willem de Kooning and the work, and fascinating discoveries, by John Elderfield, the MoMA‘s chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture, as he immersed himself in the work of Willem de Kooning in preparation for the massive show at MoMA, “de Kooning: A Retrospective”, opening 18 September 2011.  From Casper The Friendly Ghost, to stenography, to Life Magazine, and more.

image: Librado Romero/The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

A Self-Help Reader for David Foster Wallace

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 13 April 2011

David Foster Wallace in 2006.

David Foster Wallace at work in 2006

image: Suzy Allman/The New York Times

Jennifer Schuessler has written an interesting little article entitled “David Foster Wallace, Self-Help Reader” in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at David Foster Wallace and offering up a number of fascinating, and perhaps even useful, links to various “support” materials for those interested in/struggling with/obsessed with Wallace’s oeuvre.

Especially wonderful are the David Foster Wallace archives at the Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas at Austin, below.

A David Foster Wallace workbook at the University of Texas at Austin

image: Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin

Ah, the infinite jest of it all…

Also, take a look at our previous posts on David Foster Wallace, here (Piecing Together a Posthumous Novel) and here (The Staggering, Multifarious, Cacaphonous Predicament).

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nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in culture, Education, Exhibitions, General, Internet, Language, Links, Literature, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Photography, publishing, Websites | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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