Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Artists Rights Society’

On Helen Frankenthaler & John Chamberlain – Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom, by Roberta Smith

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 December 2011

The thoughtful and astute art critic Roberta Smith, has written a short article entitled “Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the similarities and differences between the works of the artists Helen Frankenthaler and John Chamberlain, who both, sadly, passed away very recently.  Smith’s sensitive and sharp mind and feeling for their work offers a discrete eulogy for two great American artists, their work’s importance in the transition from Abstract Expressionism, and the continued repercussions of their techniques and sensibilities even today.

Grace Glueck has also written a very fine article entitled “Helen Frankenthaler, Abstract Painter Who Shaped a Movement, Dies at 83” this time, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at, in more detail, the beautiful and pioneering work of Frankenthaler.

An excellent slideshow accompanies the article, here.

See our previous post on Helen Frankenthaler, Helen Frankenthaler – 30 Years of More Than Colorfield at Knoedler & Co.

top image: Mountains and Sea, by Helen Frankenthaler: Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Pop Rides the News Cycle – Andy Warhol as Precursor to Twitter & Facebook

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 22 October 2011

Holland Cotter has written a superb and insightful article entitled “Pop Rides the News Cycle” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the work, and person, of Andy Warhol, his gimlet-eyed perceptions of the integration of news, commerce and art, and two exhibitions currently on view in the U.S. capitol, “Warhol: Headlines” at the National Gallery of Art and (through 2 January 2012) “Andy Warhol: Shadows,” (through 15 January 2012) at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.  Astounding.  Sharp, concise, deep, and clear.  A must-read, whether you can get to D.C. to view the shows, or not.

Excellent, but brief, slideshow, here.

Ndlr: scopophiliac, according to Wikipedia.

top image: Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/The New York Times

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Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, Pop Art, Printmaking, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

When Art & Energy were Dancing on the Rooftops in New York – Laurie Anderson, Gordon Matta-Clark & Trisha Brown

Posted by the editors on Friday, 29 April 2011

Trisha Brown’s “Roof Piece,” (1973), depicting dancers on adjacent rooftops

Michael Kimmelman has written “When Art and Energy Were SoHo Neighbors” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, which looks at New York’s Soho, in the 1970s, with its extraordinary, vibrant artistic energy, and some of the truly inspired “lean times” work of the choreographer Trisha Brown, the artist Gordon Matta-Clark, and the performance artist Laurie Anderson and includes some wonderful photos as well as a brief, but poignant interview with Anderson.  All this in the context of the show at the Barbican Art Gallery entitled “Laurie Anderson, Trisha Brown, Gordon Matta-Clark – Pioneers of the Downtown Scene New York 1970s” (through 22 May 2011) which includes sculptures, drawings, photographs, documentation of performances and mixed media works, and which The Guardian has called simply a “brilliant exhibition”.

Here’s what the Barbican has to say about the exhibition:

Performance artist and musician Laurie Anderson, choreographer Trisha Brown and artist Gordon Matta-Clark were friends and active participants in the New York art community, working fluidly between visual art and performance.

With the city as their backdrop, canvas, stage and inspiration, this exhibition is the first major presentation to examine the experimental and often daring approaches taken by these three key figures, both individually and collectively, in the burgeoning arts scene in downtown New York during the 1970s.

New York City provided a powerful context for the work of Anderson, Brown and Matta-Clark. On the verge of bankruptcy in the 1970s, the disappearance of manufacturing and other major industries and the withdrawal of public services were turning the city into a centre of widespread unemployment and lawlessness. Artists responded by taking over derelict spaces to make and exhibit their work, by using the city itself as the medium or setting for their work, by creating opportunities to engage directly with the public out of doors and by building a vibrant arts community.

Gordon Matta-Clark, Open House, 1972

Kimmelman offers some perceptive observations regarding the art scene, then and now, including an astute, if sadly true, comparison of the 70s New York downtown art scene and the current “art scene” style of contemporary Berlin.  Economics, certainly; motivation, aspiration, inspiration, even more so…

 images: top, Babette Mangolte/The New York Times; bottom, courtesy Jane Crawford. © Estate of Cosmos Andress Sarchiapone. © 2010 Estate of Gordon Matta- Clark/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, DACS London

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Posted in Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Economy, Environment, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Links, money, Museum & Gallery Shows, music, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, performance art, Photography, sculpture, Slide Shows, theatre, video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Thinking Outside the Canvas – Blinky Palermo Retrospective

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 28 April 2011

Composition With 8 Red Rectangles” (1964), by Blinky Palermo at the Hirshhorn Museum

The wonderful art critic  Roberta Smith has written another excellent, fascinating and perceptive article, entitled “Thinking Outside the Canvas” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the impressive retrospective exhibition of work by the late German painter Blinky Palermo, entitled “Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977” at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington DC (through 15 May 2011, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & Seventh Street, SW, Washington; (202) 633-1000, hirshhorn.si.edu).  “…intractably consistent and endlessly malleable…”

According to the Hirshhorn in their online notes for the exhibition:

“Blinky Palermo (born Peter Schwartze) continually expanded the definition of painting throughout his career. The exhibition reflects this progression, following a loose chronology based on his four main bodies of work. Early works illustrate his evolution away from traditional materials while he continued to employ Modernism’s bold colors and geometric forms. Starting in 1964, Palermo’s “Stoffbilder” (Cloth Pictures) composed of sewn, horizontal strips of commercially available, solid-colored fabric mounted on stretchers, take cues from advertising and fashion of the time. The artist continued to toy with decoration and its intersection with Modernism through site-specific wall paintings, which he carefully documented with preparatory drawings and installation photographs. A number of these framed documents form the third section of the exhibition. The final phase of Palermo’s career is represented by his “Metallbilder” (Metal Pictures). An outgrowth of the previous Cloth Pictures, this series of acrylic paintings on metal culminates with “To the People of New York City” (1976), a tribute to the city the artist loved and called home from 1973 to 1976 and where he maintained a studio until his sudden death at age 33. Part of Dia’s collection and on long-term view at Dia: Beacon, this multi-panel installation is traveling for the first time.”

image: Jens Ziehe/Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y., VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/The New York Times

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Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Picasso Painting Sets Auction Record at $106.5 Million

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 5 May 2010

“Nude, Green Leaves and Bust,” a 1932 Picasso.(Image Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society, New York,

via Christie’s/The New York Times)

Carol Vogel has written a short article entitled “At $106.5 Million, a Picasso Sets an Auction Record” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times discussing the sale at Christie’s of the painting “Nude, Green Leaves and Bust” which Picasso painted in a single day in 1932.  Vogel also touches on the other sales of the event, including two sculptures by Alberto Giacometti, a painting by Edvard Munch and others.  The last time the Picasso’s “Nude, Green Leaves and Bust” changed hands, in 1951, it sold for $19,800.  Is it inflation, or is the painting that much better today than it was then?
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