Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Posts Tagged ‘Art & Design’

* Art & Design: Design Observer: Superheroes: Accidental Mysteries by John Foster

Posted by the editors on Friday, 27 April 2012

Art & Design: Design Observer: Superheroes: Accidental Mysteries by John Foster: “..a weekly cabinet of visual curiosities curated by John Foster, highlights images of design, art, architecture and ephemera brought to light by the magic of the digital age. This week’s focus is Superheroes..”  Magnificent..

image + article: John Foster, Accidental Mysteries, DesignObserver

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions, General, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Photography | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

True to His Abstraction – Ellsworth Kelly – An Explorer of Shape, Line and Color

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 22 January 2012

Carol Vogel has written a very interesting article entitled “True to His Abstraction” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the work of the abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly, his painting, sculptures, reliefs and prints, and his life-long focus on abstraction.  Sharp, aware, inspiring and vibrant, Kelly, 88 years old, offers some fascinating commentary on his work, and the work of others, and is, in many ways, an exemplary artist’s artist, dedicated to his vision, despite the vicissitudes of the art market and the art-star status of many of his contemporaries.

The article includes an excellent slideshow, here.

See our post Ellsworth Kelly – Reliefs 2009-2010 & Black & White Drawings – His Own Richest Source of Inspiration

top image: Ellsworth Kelly/Matthew Marks Gallery, The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Pop Art, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

On Helen Frankenthaler & John Chamberlain – Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom, by Roberta Smith

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 December 2011

The thoughtful and astute art critic Roberta Smith, has written a short article entitled “Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the similarities and differences between the works of the artists Helen Frankenthaler and John Chamberlain, who both, sadly, passed away very recently.  Smith’s sensitive and sharp mind and feeling for their work offers a discrete eulogy for two great American artists, their work’s importance in the transition from Abstract Expressionism, and the continued repercussions of their techniques and sensibilities even today.

Grace Glueck has also written a very fine article entitled “Helen Frankenthaler, Abstract Painter Who Shaped a Movement, Dies at 83” this time, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at, in more detail, the beautiful and pioneering work of Frankenthaler.

An excellent slideshow accompanies the article, here.

See our previous post on Helen Frankenthaler, Helen Frankenthaler – 30 Years of More Than Colorfield at Knoedler & Co.

top image: Mountains and Sea, by Helen Frankenthaler: Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Real/Surreal” at The Whitney – Jewels of Uneasiness, Faithfully Rendered

Posted by the editors on Monday, 7 November 2011

Ken Johnson has written an interesting and probing article entitled “Jewels of Uneasiness, Faithfully Rendered”, itself a rather evocative title, in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the show “Real/Surreal” (through 12 February 2012 at the Whitney Museum of American Art; (212) 570-3600, whitney.org). “Real/Surreal”, works from the Whitney’s permanent collection, is an exhibition of American art from the 1920s to the 1950s: a haunting, disenchanted, uncomfortably dream-like body of work, and a significant predecessor to the energy-filled creations of Abstract Expressionism.  Johnson proposes a resurgence of context: Depression, ecological cataclysm, war, loss of moral referents, in attempting to understand and find the roots of today’s rekindled interest in Surrealism.

top image: Edward Hopper ‘s “Early Sunday Morning” (1930), from “Real/Surreal”/Whitney Museum of American Art/The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Pop Rides the News Cycle – Andy Warhol as Precursor to Twitter & Facebook

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 22 October 2011

Holland Cotter has written a superb and insightful article entitled “Pop Rides the News Cycle” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the work, and person, of Andy Warhol, his gimlet-eyed perceptions of the integration of news, commerce and art, and two exhibitions currently on view in the U.S. capitol, “Warhol: Headlines” at the National Gallery of Art and (through 2 January 2012) “Andy Warhol: Shadows,” (through 15 January 2012) at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.  Astounding.  Sharp, concise, deep, and clear.  A must-read, whether you can get to D.C. to view the shows, or not.

Excellent, but brief, slideshow, here.

Ndlr: scopophiliac, according to Wikipedia.

top image: Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, Pop Art, Printmaking, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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