Nothing Is Invisible

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Posts Tagged ‘Alfred Hitchcock’

* Dementia 13 – The first feature film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 11 February 2012

Dementia 13 (1963)  Written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather (1972), Apocalypse Now (1979), Youth Without Youth (2007)), starring William Campbell (Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964)), Luana Anders (Night Tide (1961), That Cold Day in the Park (1969)) and Patrick Magee (A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975)).  Dementia 13, a horror thriller, and the first feature film directed by the immense Francis Ford Coppola, is, at best, at pseudo-quasi-Hitchcockian psychological thriller, with a screenplay, written by Coppola, that is extraordinarily fragmented, if not desperately lost in its loose ends.  Nevertheless, as Coppola’s first feature directorial effort, at the very least, and thanks to some wonderfully moody directing of scenes in an ancient, and haunted, Scottish castle, and a clear feel for the building of psycho-thriller tension, Dementia 13 is a must-see for any fan of Coppola, B-movie psychology, or, in fact, kitsch. Perhaps the promotional film poster says it all. (PR)

See our post on the film Youth Without Youth, written, directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola.

We recommend that you buy your DVDs.  Have a great personal film library..  Here is a link to amazon.com:

top image: Wikipedia

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Point Omega, by Don DeLillo

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 27 April 2011

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Point Omega, by Don DeLillo

Point Omega (2010) (novel) by Don DeLillo (White Noise (1985), Underworld (1997), The Body Artist (2001), Falling Man (2007)).  Disturbing, masterful, spare; lucid and complex.

According to DeLillo, the novel considers an idea from “…the writing of the Jesuit thinker and paleontologist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.”  The ‘Omega Point’ of the title “…[is] the possible idea that human consciousness is reaching a point of exhaustion and that what comes next may be either a paroxysm or something enormously sublime and unenvisionable.”  (According to Wikipedia, Teilhard makes sense of the universe by its evolutionary process. He interprets complexity as the axis of evolution of matter into a geosphere, a biosphere, into consciousness (in man), and then to supreme consciousness (the Omega Point).  The Omega Point is said to denote the state of  maximum organized complexity (complexity combined with centricity), towards which the universe is evolving.)

 As on knows, omega (the last letter of the Greek alphabet) is often used to denote the last, the end, or the ultimate limit of a set, in contrast to alpha, the first letter of the Greek alphabet. In the New Testament, God is declared to be the “alpha and omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last”. (Wikipedia)

Omega can equally be thought of as the end of death or even time, or as the name of the end; in linguistics, as the phonological word; in textual criticism, as the archetype of a manuscript tradition

At the end of Point Omega, DeLillo, in his “Acknowledgment”, writes: “24 Hour Psycho, a videowork by Douglas Gordon, was first screened in 1993 in Glasgow and Berlin.  It was installed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the summer of 2006.” 24 Hour Psycho is the showing of Alfred Hitchcock‘s classic film thriller Psycho (1960) slowed down from its usual 24 frames per second, 109 minute running time, so that it runs 1440 minutes, or 24 hours, at approximately 2 frames per second.  In Point Omega, the first and last sections of the DeLillo’s novel take place during a showing of 24 Hour Psycho.

24 Hour Psycho, as an artistic creation, deals with themes common to Gordon’s work, such as “recognition and repetition, time and memory, complicity and duplicity, authorship and authenticity, darkness and light”, as one can learn in an piece in The Guardian.  Moreover, the slideshow and text accompanying it, as highly relevant as they are to DeLillo’s work, are fascinating in their own right.

With respect to the first edition cover of Point Omega, one could wonder at the presence of the sign for infinity, given the accepted literal and symbolic understanding of “omega” as, truly, the end.  Conscious choice and interesting implications of infinite endings, or even, the end of infinity?  Amusing joke?  Artist’s choice?  Coincidence? (PR)

We recommend that you buy your books.  Have a wonderful personal library.

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images: Wikipedia

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Posted in Art, Book Reviews, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, film, General, Installations, Language, Links, Literature, Museum & Gallery Shows, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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