Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Archive for the ‘Museums’ Category

Anish Kapoor – Monumental in Paris

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 4 May 2011

[mag511anish2]

Memory” by Anish Kapoor, at the Deutsche Guggenheim (2009)

Natasha Garnett has written “Anish in Paris”, in the WSJ Magazine section of The Wall Street Journal, an excellent article and interview with the renowned, ambitious and charming Indian-born, British artist Anish Kapoor, looking at his work, his thoughts about art and fame, and his upcoming monumental work, Leviathan“, for Monumenta in Paris:  An enormous inflatable “balloon”, a major departure for the artist, who has worked almost exclusively with solid, predominantly metal, constructions, that will fill the vast, light-filled nef of the Grand Palais in Paris from 11 May- 23 June 2011.

[mag511anish1]

Anish Kapoor in his London studio, with unfinished works and a member of his team standing by.

An excellent slideshow accompanies Garnett’s article, here.

Monumenta’s wonderful official site, including photos, interviews and videos with Kapoor, here.

The Grand Palais’s fascinating official site, including a virtual visit, here.

 image: Top, Mathias Schormann/courtesy of the artist and Deutsche Guggenheim/The Wall Street Journal, bottom, Photograph by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin/The Wall Street Journal

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Advertisements

Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, sculpture, Slide Shows, video, Websites | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Infectiously Playful – Anthony Caro on the Roof of the Metropolitan

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 30 April 2011

Anthony Caro, Early One Morning (1962) Painted steel and aluminium

Ken Johnson has written “On the Met’s Roof Garden, Sculpture at Play”, an article in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the venerable Bristish sculptor Anthony Caro, his ebullient, “anything-is-possible” sculptures of the early 1960s, of which the above “Early One Morning” (1962) is certainly a wonderful example, and the exhibition on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA) in New York entitled “Anthony Caro on the Roof” (through 30 October at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; (212) 535-7710; metmuseum.org).  Johnson writes of the, perhaps thwarting, effects of art critic Clement Greenberg‘s hyperbolic praise on Caro’s work after the mid-1960s, and laments the fact that work such as “Early One Morning“, above, are not included in the Met’s show.  Happily, what Johnson terms Caro’s “break-out” sculpture, “Midday“, below, is part of the show.  Its gleaming taxi-cab yellow should be right at home in the blaring, dynamic wonder that is New York City.

Here’s an excerpt from what the Metropolitan says about the exhibition:

Sculptures by Anthony Caro (b. 1924)—who is considered the most influential and prolific British sculptor of his generation and a key figure in the development of modernist sculpture over the last sixty years—are featured in the 2011 installation on The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The installation includes a selection of sculpture in steel, painted and unpainted, spanning the artist’s career to date and highlighting principal aspects of his long career: engagement with form in space, dialogue between sculpture and architecture, and creation of new, abstract analogies for the human figure and landscape.

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the first exhibition of steel sculpture by the artist, who lives and works in London. The large-scale works on view this summer are Midday, 1960 (Museum of Modern Art, New York), After Summer, 1968 (Collection of Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto), Odalisque, 1984 (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), Blazon, 1987–90 (Courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York and Annely Juda Fine Art, London), and End Up, 2010 (Collection of the artist, courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York). The installation is situated in the Museum’s dramatic open-air space offering unparalleled views of Central Park and the New York City skyline.

“Midday”, Anthony Caro, 1960, included in the rooftop exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

image: top, © Barford Sculptures Ltd/Tate, London 2009/venicebiennale.britishcouncil.org; bottom, Anthony Caro/artinfo.com

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, jazz, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Salman Rushdie on the Dissident Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 20 April 2011

 

Ai Weiwei’s “release is a matter of extreme urgency and the governments of the free world have a clear duty in this matter.”, states, with urgent clarity, Salman Rushdie

image: Rodrigo Corral & Jennifer Carrow/The New York Times

The eminent writer and social observer Salman Rushdie has written a short, clear article entitled “Dangerous Arts” as an op-ed contributor to The Opinion Pages of The New York Times.  Rushdie states his, and a great many others’, view of the arrest and detention of the dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei by the Chinese government and urges others, artists in the forefront, to speak out, mobilise, and urge their own governments to make it very clear that the Chinese authorities’ treatment of Mr. Ai, and others, is unacceptable.

As Mr. Rushdie states his point, “Today the government of China has become the world’s greatest threat to freedom of speech, and so we need Ai Weiwei, Liao Yiwu and Liu Xiaobo” and others who dare to speak out.

See our previous post on the arrest of Ai Weiwei, “Ai Weiwei – Artist, Architect & Living Symbol of China’s Conscience“, here.

Share this post on Twitter, Facebook, …

Bookmark and Share

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Language, Links, Literature, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Artist as Obstreperous Rebel & Sardonic Social Commentator – “German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse” at MoMA

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 26 March 2011

Erich Heckel’s “Franzi Reclining”, 1910.  Part of MoMA’s extraordinary collection of German Expressionism prints.

image: Museum of Modern Art, New York

Roberta Smith has written a wonderful, lively and informative article entitled “Bleak Visions From Early-20th-Century Rebels” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the highly colorful and intensely graphic exhibition “German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse”  at the Museum of Moder Art (open to the public Sunday 27 March – 11 July, 2011, (212) 708-9400, moma.org).  Smith describes the show as, among other things, “infused with an urgent, crackling energy, by turns joyful, satiric, grim and tragic”, easily motivation enough for one to see it. 

However, for those of us who, for some reason, won’t be in New York between tomorrow and 11 July, MoMA has announced that as of Sunday all 3,380 German Expressionist works on paper in its collection will become available for online viewing at moma.org/germanexpressionism.  Amazing, and excellent.

In the meantime, great slideshow, here. 

Share this post on Twitter, Facebook, …

Bookmark and Share

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Internet, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, Slide Shows, Websites | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

London’s Tate Modern – Who Am I?

Posted by the editors on Monday, 21 March 2011

The Tate Modern in London by Herzog and de Meuron, 2001

image: galinsky.com – Google

Kati Krause has written a very interesting and informative article entitled “Tate Modern Finds Its Match – New director Chris Dercon wants to redefine the role of the public museum”  in the Arts & Entertainment section of The Wall Street Journal (online), looking at the role of contemporary art museums, in general, and, much more specifically, the role of London’s Tate Modern, as seen by its new director, Chris Dercon, formerly of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in New York, now MoMA PS1, the Witte de With contemporary art museum in Rotterdam, the Boijmans Van Beuningen, also in Rotterdam and Haus der Kunst in Munich.  Dynamic, active, engaged.

Share this post on Twitter, Facebook, …

Bookmark and Share

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Art, Business, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, performance art, Photography, sculpture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: