Nothing Is Invisible

……….Cultural Kaleidoscopy………..

Archive for the ‘culture’ Category

* Arts: Damien Hirst’s official website has now launched‏

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 22 March 2012

Arts: Damien Hirst’s official website has now launched‏:  “The official website for the British artist Damien Hirst has now launched.  Visit damienhirst.com to browse a selection of over 250 major artworks.  Taken from a wide cross-section of the artist’s most important series, the websites Catalogue of Work spans 31 years and will be added to every month.

As well as an extensive resource on Hirst’s work, damienhirst.com will enable visitors to keep up to date on his latest projects and exhibitions, including Tate Modern’s forthcoming retrospective — the first to be held in Britain.  The site also provides a unique view into Hirst’s studio practise by way of a live video stream.”

image: Damien Hirst; text: Other Criteria

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Posted in Art, Conceptual Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Installations, Internet, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture, video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Museum & Gallery Shows: Lucien Freud – Portraits, at the National Portrait Gallery

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 9 February 2012

Museum & Gallery Shows: Lucien Freud – Portraits, at the National Portrait Gallery, 9 February-27 May, 2012:  From the National Portrait Gallery: “Lucian Freud (1922 – 2011) was one of the most important and influential artists of his generation. Paintings of people were central to his work and this major exhibition, spanning over seventy years, is the first to focus on his portraiture.

Produced in close collaboration with the late Lucian Freud, the exhibition concentrates on particular periods and groups of sitters which illustrate Freud’s stylistic development and technical virtuosity. Insightful paintings of the artist’s lovers, friends and family, referred to by the artist as the ‘people in my life’, will demonstrate the psychological drama and unrelenting observational intensity of his work.

Featuring 130 works from museums and private collections throughout the world, some of which have never been seen before, this is an unmissable opportunity to experience the work of one of the world’s greatest artists.”

“I’ve always wanted to create drama in my pictures, which is why I paint people. It’s people who have brought drama to pictures from the beginning. The simplest human gestures tell stories.” (Lucien Freud)

Stunning.  Marvelous.  Corporeal.

image: Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985 by Lucien Freud, Private Collection, Ireland © The Lucian Freud Archive.  Courtesy Lucian Freud Archive, npg.org.uk

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Museum & Gallery Shows, Museums, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Book Review: Pulse by Julian Barnes

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 29 January 2012

Book Review: Pulse (2011)(collection of short stories) by Julian Barnes (Flaubert’s Parrot (1984, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), England, England (1998, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), Arthur & George (2005, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), The Sense of an Ending (2011, winner of the Booker Prize).  Pulse is a collection of wonderful short stories taking the pulse of couples, and in which couples are the pulse, the life blood.  From parents, to newly weds, to first dates, to esoteric historical, from sharp, well-to-do couples, to once-hippie aging couples, to ’til-death-do-us-part couples, to couples divorcing within a year of marriage, from hetero to homo, from love to sex, from complicity to antagonism, from no-strings to all things, Pulse throws its net wide, not that there aren’t an infinity of couples outside of the net, each being, by definition unique, and unfathomable, no matter what we know.  In fact, what is love?  And, to paraphrase and twist, a bit, Raymond Carver, what (don’t) we talk about when we (don’t) talk about love; pain, fun, sharing, loss, thrill, support, tenderness and grief. A must-read for anyone who is, was, or will be part of a couple, or ever wished, or regretted, that they were part of a couple.  And for those solitaries who just wonder about it all.  Marvelous, thoughtful, entertaining and more. (PR)

See our post on the collection of short stories by Raymond Carver, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.

We recommend that you buy you books.  Have a wonderful personal library..  Here are links to amazon.com:

top image: The Guardian

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Book Reviews, Books, culture, Fiction, General, Language, Literature | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

On Helen Frankenthaler & John Chamberlain – Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom, by Roberta Smith

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 December 2011

The thoughtful and astute art critic Roberta Smith, has written a short article entitled “Two Artists Who Embraced Freedom” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the similarities and differences between the works of the artists Helen Frankenthaler and John Chamberlain, who both, sadly, passed away very recently.  Smith’s sensitive and sharp mind and feeling for their work offers a discrete eulogy for two great American artists, their work’s importance in the transition from Abstract Expressionism, and the continued repercussions of their techniques and sensibilities even today.

Grace Glueck has also written a very fine article entitled “Helen Frankenthaler, Abstract Painter Who Shaped a Movement, Dies at 83” this time, in the Arts section of The New York Times, looking at, in more detail, the beautiful and pioneering work of Frankenthaler.

An excellent slideshow accompanies the article, here.

See our previous post on Helen Frankenthaler, Helen Frankenthaler – 30 Years of More Than Colorfield at Knoedler & Co.

top image: Mountains and Sea, by Helen Frankenthaler: Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/The New York Times

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Art, culture, Exhibitions, General, Links, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible, painting, sculpture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

White Hunter Black Heart – directed by and starring Clint Eastwood

Posted by the editors on Friday, 25 November 2011

White Hunter Black Heart (1990)(DVD)  Directed by and starring Clint Eastwood (The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), Dirty Harry (1971), Pale Rider (1985), Unforgiven (1992), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), Mystic River (2003), Gran Torino (2008), Invictus (2009), and many other magnificent films, as actor, director and/or producer), with Jeff Fahey (Planet Terror (2007) and many others), George Dzundza (The Deer Hunter (1978), Streamers (1983), Grey’s Anatomy (2006)), Marisa Berenson (Death in Venice (1971), Cabaret (1972), Barry Lyndon (1975),  I Am Love (2010)) and others.  In this drama, based on the eponymous novel by Peter Viertel which in turn is based on Viertel’s personal experience as final screenwriter for the legendary film The African Queen (1951), starring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn, Clint Eastwood plays a Hollywood film director, John Wilson, clearly based on the notoriously difficult and self-centered John Huston, director of The African Queen and many other iconic cinema masterpieces.  In fact, if the small steamboat used in the whitewater scene in White Hunter Black Heart seems familiar, it’s no coincidence:  it is the same boat that Bogart’s character captained in The African Queen!  White Hunter Black Heart, a critical success and a box-office disaster, is a complex film, dealing with antisemitism, racism, and, of course, John Huston’s complicated and disagreeable character.  Eastwood’s directing is quite good, as is his acting, of course.  However, despite having played self-centered characters previously, in many of his westerns, here, it is somehow difficult to accept Eastwood’s posturing; perhaps it’s just the accent, and the character John Wilson’s affectations.  Nevertheless, for Eastwood fans, and fans of the legendary films of John Huston (especially The African Queen), White Hunter Black Heart is a film to be seen. (PR)

See on post on the Clint Eastwood-directed film Invictus.  See our posts on director John Huston’s film, The Misfits, and his final film, The Dead.

We recommend buying your DVDs.  Have a great personal film library..  Here are links to amazon.com:

Here is a link to Roger Ebert’s review of White Hunter, Black Heart, in the Chicago Sun Times.

top image: Wikipedia

nothingisinvisible@live.fr

Posted in Blu-ray Disks, culture, DVDs, film, Film Reviews, General, Nothing Is Invisible, nothingisinvisible | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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